Manpages

NAME

fns_policies − overview of the FNS Policies

DESCRIPTION

FNS defines policies for naming objects in the federated namespace. The goal of these policies is to allow easy and uniform composition of names. The policies use the basic rule that objects with narrower scopes are named relative to objects with wider scopes.

FNS policies are described in terms of the following three categories: global, enterprise, and application.
Global naming service

A global naming service is a naming service that has world-wide scope. Internet DNS and X.500 are examples of global naming services. The types of objects named at this global level are typically countries, states, provinces, cities, companies, universities, institutions, and government departments and ministries. These entities are referred to as enterprises.

Enterprise-level naming service

Enterprise-level naming services are used to name objects within an enterprise. Within an enterprise, there are naming services that provide contexts for naming common entities such as
organizational units, physical sites, human users, and computers. Enterprise-level naming services are bound below the global naming services. Global naming services provide contexts in which the root contexts of enterprise-level naming services can be bound.

Application-level naming service

Application-level naming services are incorporated in applications offering services such as file service, mail service, print service, and so on. Application-level naming services are bound below enterprise naming services. The enterprise-level naming services provide contexts in which contexts of application-level naming services can be bound.

FNS has policies for global and enterprise naming. Naming within applications is left to individual applications or groups of related applications and not specified by FNS.

FNS policy specifies that DNS and X.500 are global naming services that are used to name enterprises. The global namespace is named using the name .... A DNS name or an X.500 name can appear after the .... Support for federating global naming services is planned for a future release of FNS.

Within an enterprise, there are namespaces for organizational units, sites, hosts, users, files and services, referred to by the names orgunit, site, host, user, fs, and service. In addition, these namespaces can be named using these names with an added underscore (’_’) prefix (for example, host and _host have the same binding). The following table summarizes the FNS policies.

In Solaris, an organizational unit name corresponds to an NIS+ domain name and is identified using either the fully-qualified form of its NIS+ domain name, or its NIS+ domain name relative
to the NIS+ root. Fully-qualified NIS+ domain names have a terminal dot (’.’). For example, assume that the NIS+ root domain is "Wiz.COM." and "sales" is a subdomain of that. Then, the names org/sales.Wiz.COM. and org/sales both refer to the organizational unit corresponding to the same NIS+ domain sales.Wiz.COM.

User names correspond to names in the corresponding NIS+ passwd.org_dir table. The file system context associated with a user is obtained from his entry in the NIS+ passwd.org_dir table.

Host names correspond to names in the corresponding NIS+ hosts.org_dir table. The file system context associated with a host corresponds to the files systems exported by the host.

EXAMPLES

Example 1: The types of objects that may be named relative to an organizational unit name are: user, host, service, file, and site. Here are some examples of names name objects relative to organizational unit names:
org/accounts_payable.finance/site/videoconference.northwing

names a conference room videoconference located in the north wing of the site associated with the organizational unit accounts_payable.finance.

org/finance/user/mjones

names a user mjones in the organizational unit finance.

org/finance/host/inmail

names a machine inmail belonging to the organizational unit finance.

org/accounts_payable.finance/fs/pub/blue-and-whites/FY92-124

names a file pub/blue-and-whites/FY92-124 belonging to the organizational unit accounts_payable.finance.

org/accounts_payable.finance/service/calendar

names the calendar service of the organizational unit accounts_payable.finance. This might manage the meeting schedules of the organizational unit.

Example 2: The types of objects that may be named relative to a site name are services and files. Here are some examples of names that name objects relative to sites:
site/b5.mtv/service/printer/speedy

names a printer speedy in the b5.mtv site.

site/admin/fs/usr/dist

names a file directory usr/dist available in the site admin.

Example 3: The types of objects that may be named relative to a user name are services and files. Here are some examples of names that name objects relative to users:
user/jsmith/service/calendar

names the
calendar
service of the user jsmith.

user/jsmith/fs/bin/games/riddles

names the file bin/games/riddles of the user jsmith.

Example 4: The types of objects that may be named relative to a host name are services and files. Here are some examples of names that name objects relative to hosts:
host/mailhop/service/mailbox

names the
mailbox
service associated with the machine mailhop.

host/mailhop/fs/pub/saf/archives.91

names the directory pub/saf/archives.91 found under the root directory of the machine mailhop.

SEE ALSO

fncreate(1M), nis+(1), xfn(3XFN), fns(5), fns_initial_context(5), fns_references(5)

COMMENTS